LA Street Lights Changing to LEDs (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)

LA Street Lights Changing to LEDs

A major lighting retrofit project in downtown Los Angeles is changing from the 250 Watt high pressure sodium (HPS) lamps used to light the streets since the late 1920s to modern LED lighting systems. The Bureau of Street Lighting reported that more than half of its streetlights have already been retrofitted to LED, a move that once complete is expected to save the taxpayers of Los Angeles almost 80 percent in energy costs and provide better color rendering for enhanced visibility, safety and security throughout the community.

Lighting manufacturer Amerlux, Oakland, N.J., highlighted its role, having recently supplied 600 of its 41 W Avista LED light engines to convert existing lamps as part of the project. Avista can be used in traditional post top and other fixtures designed for street lighting, parks, pedestrian walkways, recreational areas, parking lots, schools and municipalities. In Los Angeles, the system was used to replace the older HPS lamps in post top mounted fixtures in area and pedestrian settings. The installed units there have a color temperature of 4000K and produce 100 lumens per Watt.

The light engine is field adjusted to optimize performance and operates on automatic AC incoming voltage sensing 120-277 volt systems. It features over voltage and short circuit protection with a 10kV surge protector, as well as a sealed LED chamber and street-specific optics.

"Our Avista is the perfect LED light engine for exterior lighting applications throughout downtown LA and other cities across the nation," explained Amerlux CEO/President Chuck Campagna. "This revolutionary LED engine helps customers convert outdoor fixtures to LED with significant cost savings that will meet critical lighting and power budgets and energy code compliance."

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