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Surplus dealers form trade association

Jan. 1, 2003
A number of dealers who buy and sell surplus electrical equipment are establishing a new trade association. By doing so, they hope to raise quality standards

A number of dealers who buy and sell surplus electrical equipment are establishing a new trade association. By doing so, they hope to raise quality standards and improve the image of surplus dealers in the industry.

The Professional Electrical Apparatus Recyclers League (PEARL), Parker, Colo., will set standards for surplus dealers to "create a marketable distinction in quality, safety and integrity for PEARL members in the eyes of their customers," says the group's mission statement. The group's first official meeting is scheduled for February in Denver, Colo.

Membership is restricted to companies that meet 11 qualification requirements, according to the association's bylaws. To qualify for the group, companies must own, maintain and warehouse at least $500,000 worth of electrical power equipment, not including consigned inventory; must have annual sales of at least $1 million; must maintain product liability coverage for claims equal to their annual sales but no less than $2 million; must maintain test equipment required by the group's technical reference materials and adhere to testing and documentation procedures prescribed by the group; and must abide by the group's code of ethics.

The group's standards for test equipment and procedures are being developed by of member volunteers, with engineering assistance from Technical Diagnostic Services, Arlington, Texas. PEARL will publish its standards so that prospective customers can see what they can expect from PEARL members.

About the Author

Doug Chandler | Senior Staff Writer

Doug has been reporting and writing on the electrical industry for Electrical Wholesaling and Electrical Marketing since 1992 and still finds the industry’s evolution and the characters who inhabit its companies endlessly fascinating. That was true even before e-commerce, LED lighting and distributed generation began to disrupt so many of the electrical industry’s traditional practices.

Doug earned a BA in English Literature from the University of Kansas after spending a few years in KU’s William Allen White School of Journalism, then deciding he absolutely did not want to be a journalist. In the company of his wife, two kids, two dogs and two cats, he spends a lot of time in the garden and the kitchen – growing food, cooking, brewing beer – and helping to run the family coffee shop.

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